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W. H. Auden quotes

Thousands have lived without love, not one without water.

Learn from your dreams what you lack.

May it not be that, just as we have to have faith in Him, God has to have faith in us and, considering the history of the human race so far, may it not be that 'faith' is even more difficult for Him than it is for us?

We are all here on earth to help others; what on earth the others are here for I don't know.

'Healing,' Papa would tell me, 'is not a science, but the intuitive art of wooing nature.'

In times of joy, all of us wished we possessed a tail we could wag.

It is a sad fact about our culture that a poet can earn much more money writing or talking about his art than he can by practicing it.

Murder is unique in that it abolishes the party it injures, so that society has to take the place of the victim and on his behalf demand atonement or grant forgiveness; it is the one crime in which society has a direct interest.

When I am in the company of scientists, I feel like a shabby curate who has strayed by mistake into a drawing room full of dukes.

Like everything which is not the involuntary result of fleeting emotion but the creation of time and will, any marriage, happy or unhappy, is infinitely more interesting than any romance, however passionate.

I don't get acting jobs because of my looks.

When I find myself in the company of scientists, I feel like a shabby curate who has strayed by mistake into a room full of dukes.

Every American poet feels that the whole responsibility for contemporary poetry has fallen upon his shoulders, that he is a literary aristocracy of one.

I'll love you, dear, I'll love you till China and Africa meet and the river jumps over the mountain and the salmon sing in the street.

Among those whom I like or admire, I can find no common denominator, but among those whom I love, I can: all of them make me laugh.

Choice of attention - to pay attention to this and ignore that - is to the inner life what choice of action is to the outer. In both cases, a man is responsible for his choice and must accept the consequences, whatever they may be.

A poet is, before anything else, a person who is passionately in love with language.

A professor is someone who talks in someone else's sleep.

Almost all of our relationships begin and most of them continue as forms of mutual exploitation, a mental or physical barter, to be terminated when one or both parties run out of goods.

Evil is unspectacular and always human, and shares our bed and eats at our own table.