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Maureen Dowd quotes

Wooing the press is an exercise roughly akin to picnicking with a tiger. You might enjoy the meal, but the tiger always eats last.

Obama invented himself against all odds and repeated parental abandonment, and he worked hard to regiment his emotions. But now that can come across as imperviousness and inflexibility. He wants to run the agenda; he doesn't want the agenda to run him. Once you become president, though, there's no way to predict what your crises will be.

Reagan didn't socialize with the press. He spent his evenings with Nancy, watching TV with dinner trays. But he knew that to transcend, you can't condescend.

The minute you settle for less than you deserve, you get even less than you settled for.

Celebrity distorts democracy by giving the rich, beautiful, and famous more authority than they deserve.

As a woman, I know that if I write about another woman, it will be perceived as a catfight.

And as far as doing God's work, I think the bankers who took government money and then gave out obscene bonuses are the same self-interested sorts Jesus threw out of the temple.

Americans want to be protected, but not at the cost of vitiating the values that make us Americans.

F.D.R. achieved greatness not by means of imposing his temperament and intellect on the world but by reacting to what the world threw at him.

For two centuries, the South has feared a takeover by blacks or the feds. In Obama, they have both.

I find having a column a very difficult form of journalism. I'm not a natural like Tom Friedman and Anna Quindlen.

It takes a lot of adrenaline and fear to make me actually write.

Journalism, spooked by rumors of its own obsolescence, has stopped believing in itself. Groans of doom alternate with panicked happy talk.

Maybe Obama was not even the person he was waiting for.

My eating habits were so bad for many years that I didn't actually know the intricacies of making a salad.

Obama hates selling. He thinks people should just accept the right thing to do.

One must not attempt to justify them, but rather to sense their nature simply and clearly.

President Obama thinks he can use emotion to bring pressure on Congress. But that's not how adults with power respond to things.

When you go into a fight saying you're probably going to lose, you're probably going to lose.

As blue chips turn into penny stocks, Wall Street seems less like a symbol of America's macho capitalism and more like that famous Jane Austen character Mrs. Bennet, a flibbertigibbet always anxious about getting richer and her 'poor nerves.'